Medieval Rood Screen of Wiggenhall St Mary the Virgin, Norfolk

DSC_0450

I re-visited a church today, Wiggenhall St Mary the Virgin in Norfolk, to re-take some photos of a rood screen, as I hadn’t done it justice with the first photos.  The reason being, I wasn’t that interested to start with, I did think that they were amazing pieces of art, but there are so many fascinating parts to a church, that sometimes is very difficult to know what to focus on.  What got me focused on them now………was yesterday’s post, looking at them in detail, it just suddenly struck me how really beautiful they are.  Also most of them date from around the 14th to 15th century……a piece of art that is hundreds of years old.  Some are quite badly damaged, some are just not looked after, and in the churches that now have heating, this is causing a lot of damage.

DSC_0351

The rood screen separated the chance from the nave (the chancel for the priests and the nave for the people) there would have been a top screen with more panels and on top would have been the rood, this was a great crucifix, flanked by the Virgin and St John.

DSC_0442

DSC_0440

DSC_0437

There are about 400 in East Anglia….I’m not going to be able to visit all of them…..but I will try to collect as many as I can.  They are really amazing, because the lower part of the screen survived the Reformation, due to the chancels being made redundant in the church and they were turned into school rooms, cupboards, meeting rooms or vestries, the bottom of the screens were useful for cordoning the chancel off from the nave.  It was only the Victorians who restored the chancels to their proper use.  Some screens had been white washed over, so it was really only when the Victorians started to carry out well needed restoration repairs, that many of them came to light.  Also not one complete rood screen with rood has remained, I have seen some very good copies…..but how fantastic it would have been to have an seen an original one……the Reformation has a lot to answer for, in more ways than one.

DSC_0452

This screen in Wiggenhall St Mary the Virgin in Norfolk is quite unusual in that most of the figures depicted are females saints also the Virgin and Child.  From the north to south side they are: Mary Magdalene, St Dorothy, St Margaret, probably St Scholastica or possibly St Anne, St Catherine of Alexandria, St Barbara, The Virgin and Child and the end panel, St John the Baptist.

DSC_0451

DSC_0449

DSC_0448

DSC_0447

DSC_0446

DSC_0453

DSC_0428

6 comments

  1. I find these paintings achingly beautiful in themselves, and even more stunning when you consider their history and the fact that anything at all survives. I’ve loved the various series you’ve given us, but I really think this will be your best. So looking forward to more.

    1. Glad you like them, they are very difficult to photograph, most of them are shiny and the light bounces back, I have got better and now I can get it to just a small bounce back. I think thats what put me off posting them before, but you are right they are very beautiful in more ways then one 🙂

  2. Beautiful – when you think how many people have sat and looked at them, it’s just incredible. As I’ve said, I’ve never seen anything like these so I’m enjoying this little tour of rood screens!

    1. I think I just love the age of them, so ancient and now so delicate. Some are really quite damaged and it is amazing that they are still here, but how much longer for, there are more things to damage them nowadays. So I thought I would try and collect as many as I can, but is not going to be a quick series, more likely years, if you go by the round tower churches collection, still once the warmer weather comes, we can go further a field 🙂

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s