Inverness Castle, Scotland

We visited Inverness, which is on the east coast of Scotland, just before Christmas 2016, and again at the start of  March 2017, unfortunately on each trip, we were unable to stop in the centre of the city….. we had run out of time on both occasion.  I could only managed to get a few photos from the car window.  Also the visits were late in the afternoon and the light was fading.  To top it all, the castle had scaffolding around one of the towers, but then I noticed, very small people looking out over the city.  I want to keep a record of the scaffolding, as we will be visiting again, and although the castle is not open, the castle grounds and gardens are.  I would like to go back in the sunshine and take some more photos.  Inverness is growing at a great rate of knots and soon will become another large Scottish city.  So I would like to try to collect some little bits of Inverness, before they all vanish.

A little history ………The sandstone Inverness Castle, was built in 1836 to plans drawn by architect William Burn.  It was constructed on a mound overlooking the city and the River Ness.  In 1848, a building known as the North Block was added and served as a prison.  But a castle had occupied the site from possibly as far back as the 11th Century.  Over the centuries, the fortification fell under the control of the forces of Edward I, Robert the Bruce and James I, II and IV.  In 1562, it was attacked and damaged by soldiers loyal to Mary, Queen of Scots, before it was almost destroyed by Royalist troops in the 1600s.
Bonnie Prince Charlie’s forces blew the castle up in 1746 to prevent it from falling into the hands of government troops.  It was said that a French sergeant, who had brought his poodle with him to Scotland, set off the explosives.  The soldier was caught in the blast, and his body was blown across to the opposite side of the River Ness, his dog survived.  Today the castle houses Inverness Sheriff Court. The Drum Tower houses an exhibition of castle history and is open daily in the summer season. The castle itself is not open to the public.

25 comments

  1. Funny, I was thinking the photos looked a little grey and assumed it was the b/w. Then you say it was an overcast day!
    Lovely to capture the development of the castle and I hope you get to actually visit next time – and in sunshine! 🙂

    1. I did change them to black & white, they were so dark otherwise 🙂 Sometimes they look lighter in b&W. They are thinking of opening the castle to visitors, will have to wait and see 🙂

  2. As always a fun history lesson from you. I never cam across the expression “growing at a great rate of knots.” Is that a common Brit phrase? Any thoughts about it? It is a wonderful figure of speech. Thanks for letting me travel with you.

    1. Well, I come from a navel town, Portsmouth on the South Coast. Most of my uncles were in the navy and they would always say, when they came back from sea, that my brother and I had grown at a great rate of knots……meaning the speed that a ship travels through the water. I’m not sure if it is said anywhere else in the UK… ha ha it has now jumped the pond 🙂 Glad you are still travelling 🙂

    1. I wrote about the unicorn statues on another post a couple of years ago……..A unicorn looks down from the top of its shaft. Although we now look at the unicorn as a mythical creature, in times past there were few who disbelieved their existence and of the magical powers they possessed. Unicorn because of their peers, were often taken as symbolic of Christ……thought you might are interested 🙂

  3. So cool! I’ve always wanted to go to Scotland. I nominated you for the Blogger Recognition Award. Check out my blog for details!

    1. Hi Jen, you come from an up and coming city, which can only be good for everyone in the local area, jobs etc. Yes we have visited Lock Ness many times, but have never seen Nessie 🙂 we love Scotland and any chance to go, we do 🙂

      1. We have gone from one end of the Outer Hebrides to the other end, nearly all the Inner Hebrides. All along the West Coast, up to Ullapool and then up to John O’Groats, Wick and back down along the East Coast. All the major cities, these are due to work related trips, several times a year. We are back up again in May and will be visiting Islay and Jura again, Skye, Mull, Iona, staying at Campbelltown, Oban and Fort William, we have a motor home and just love Scotland……ha ha no matter what the weather is like, luckily most of the time its fine 🙂

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