Views of Scotland

The Jacobite & Glenfinnan, Scotland

 

Every year when we go to the west coast of Scotland, we travel from Fort William to Mallaig along the ‘Romantic Road to the Isles’ its a must if you are visiting the West Coast of Scotland.  Even better if you can travel on the West Highland Railway Line.  The last time we manage to travel on the train, was 2012, you have to book about a year in advance, even then its touch and go.  So early last year 2016 we booked, we got some of the last seats, even booking that early.  We are making the trip in about three weeks time and looking back at last years photos I found some of our visit to one of the stations on the line, a very famous one at Glenfinnan.  Glenfinnan is where, in 1745, the ‘Jacobite Rising’ started and there is now a 60ft tall monument, which was built to commemorate the occasion.  Unfortunately the monument was having a facelift, but you get the idea how tall it is.  While we were visiting the station the train came in, ‘ The Jacobite’  it was quite a long stop as you are allow to disembark and take photos.  Once the train left the station, we jumped in the car and gave chase.  I wanted to catch the train going over a particular bridge very near to Mallaig and having missed it so many times in the past, I got lucky this time and got my train.  So I thought I better post last years 2016 trip, before this years 2017 trip 🙂

 

 

 

 

Cloudy High Road to Glen Coe, Scotland

We have been to Suffolk for the week-end and unfortunately….no internet, so I sorted some photos.  We had a lovely visit, as the sun shone all week-end, lots of exploring…..so even more photos to sort.  The above photos, are therefore not Suffolk, but of our last trip through Glen Coe, December 2016.  Every time we drive up to and through the Glen, the weather is different, this time is was very cloudy, beautiful in its own right 🙂

Clouds, Jura & Islay, Scotland

We spent eight hours on a train today, we travelled from Peterborough in Cambridgeshire to Edinburgh in Scotland, four hours there and four hours back….. six hours in Edinburgh.  A special offer on the trains, was to good to miss, so we choose to go to Edinburgh.  Normally we only visit in passing, mostly just a couple of hours, so this quite a treat.  We did lots of exploring, but I haven’t download todays photos yet, so here are a few cloud photos from our trip to Islay & Jura, Scotland, last year 2016. First two photos are Islay and the last two are views of Jura.

 

Tullibardine Distillery, Blackford, Scotland

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Following on from Deanston Distillery, May 2016, we visited Tullibardine Distillery.  This was a new Whisky for me, not so to my husband, but it was interesting to find one that I had not heard of before. The distillery stands at the western end of the village of Blackford, which itself stands in the shadow of the Ochil Hills and on the north side of the main A9 about half way between Stirling and Perth.

Tullibardine whisky distillery was founded in 1949 on the site of an old brewery, one which was said to have brewed ale for King James IV’s coronation back in 1488! The brewery itself dated back to the 12th century so it’s fair to say that the site has had an incredibly long brewing and distilling history.

Named for Tullibardine Moor, the distillery draws its water from the Danny Burn and lies to the south-west of Blackford. The area is renowned for the purity of its water, indeed Highland Spring is bottled locally. Queen Helen, the wife of King Magnus of Alba, drowned in a ford after falling from her horse not far from the town and Blackford was named accordingly.

Following purchase by Invergordon in 1971, Tullibardine’s stills capacity was increased from two to four. Two decades later, Invergordon was acquired by Whyte and Mackay and a year later the whisky distillery was shut down. In December of 2003, the distillery was put back into production following the June acquisition of Tullibardine for the sum of £1.1 million. A year later a Café and Shop were opened at the Tullibardine distillery, which today has a capacity of 2.5 million litres per annum.

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From Glencoe Mountain Resort to Glencoe Visitor Centre, Scotland

 

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I never tire of the drive to and through Glencoe in Scotland, the scenery is dramatic in any weather.  This trip is from the Glencoe Mountain Resort to Glencoe Visitor Centre.  The photos were taken last May 2016, in fact we made the trip each way on different days, and on both occasions, the weather was so different.  It just proves how difficult it can be in extreme weather, but this was the good day and the weather was excellent.  The visitor centre is very interesting and explains all about the Glencoe Massacre in 1692.  There are many interesting sites that you can google, which will explain all, far better than I can, mine is really just a visual experience, which I hope you enjoy as much as I do.

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The following photos are of the visitor centre and views of the u-shape glen.

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