Views of Wales

Welsh Rocks

Every year we used to spend Easter in Wales, then we stopped, I think because there was too much traffic on the roads.  Well today, Good Friday, the traffic on the main road to the North Norfolk coast from the other side of Wisbech in Cambridgeshire, was pretty horrific.  I have never seen so many caravans and motorhomes on the road in the ten years that we have lived here in the Fens.  It was a shame as no-one was going anywhere for a quite a while, thank goodness we were going the other way.  It looked like a mass evacuation and for once I was pleased we were not going away……we had a pre Easter trip two weeks ago.

 We had a good day despite the weather, three churches, two firmly locked and hurrah, one open.  Good Friday and two out of three churches locked.   I did actually think over Easter they would be open, but we were in Cambridgeshire, a county that I find most of the churches are locked.

A photo from a previous Easter Holiday in Wales.

A Postcard from Sunny New Quay, Wales

For this years visit to New Quay, Wales, we actually stayed in New Quay at ‘The Black Lion’, we normally take our motorhome and stay a couple of miles away on a caravan site.  We were only here for the weekend, as we go away again on Wednesday, but it was quite nice to stop in the seaside town itself.  When we arrived we went for a walk down to the harbour and I took a few photos, so glad I did, because that sunshine was the last we would see, until we got home.

New Quay was once a thriving port, shipbuilding and fishing centre, although is has recently become a very popular seaside destination for seaside holidays. The Harbour and Dolau beaches have stunning golden sands to rival any, and have also become a favourite for fishing and watersports enthusiasts. New Quay is also one of the best spots in Ceredigion to see bottlenose dolphins and is home to a marine wildlife centre.

September 2016

Rough Sea, Llangrannog, Wales

Our trip to Wales last weekend was hampered by rain 90% of the time, at times like this, you have to make the best of what you have been dealt with.  So it was off to the beaches to try my hand at some seascapes and having some fun when sorting them.  This is one of the beaches, Llangrannog, and I have added some details about the beach.

Boasting superb coastal scenery coupled with two sandy beaches; the main one and the adjoining Cilborth Beach in a hidden cove. Llangrannog has always been popular with locals and visitors alike. Once you have traversed the lanes of the steep sided valley of the River Hawen access is good . There is a seafront car park and in the summer months there is additional parking 5 minutes walk from the main beach. The bay is safe with attention to the care needed with any seaside activity
Dogs are allowed on part of the beach from May through September but the rest of the family can have a really enjoyable day out at Llangrannog where there is a well-stocked beach shop and café. More information.

From the Visit Cardigan web page.

September 2015

Where Red Kites Play

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On the road just after the village of Llanon on the coast of Cardigan Bay, Wales, if you look up, nine times out of ten, you will see two Red Kites playing in the sky.  At the week-end, when we were on our way home, after a visit to Wales, I glanced up and saw them playing in the thermals, soaring higher and higher into the stormy clouds and luckily, camera was ready.

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This is where they play, Llanon, Wales.

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September 2016

Lucky Welsh Heather

 

 

I can remember, as a child, when travellers used to knock on our front door and sell my mother little bits of heather wrapped around with silver foil, calling it lucky heather.  My mother always bought it, saying it would be unlucky if she didn’t, I could never fathom that one out. But anyway, look what I found in Wales at the weekend, lucky heather, not a lot of it, but in the pouring rain it made a lovely splash of colour.  We were having a drive around the hills near Tregaron in Ceredigion (western mid Wales), not really much else you can do when the rain is horizontal 🙂

September 2016

Pontcysyllte Aqueduct, Nr Llangollen, Wales

 

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This is the second aqueduct that we visited in 2011, while on holiday in Wales.  The first was Chirk Aqueduct, which I posted about yesterday.  Now I thought Chirk was high, but Pontcysyllte near Llangollen, was a whole new kettle of fish.  We joined the towpath on what is called the ‘Tramway’ this had been a small railway that carried goods along the canal.

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Pontcysyllte was built a few years after Chirk, in 1805, and is the longest and highest in Britain.  The Aqueduct with the canal, was made a world Heritage Site in 2009.  Thomas Telford and William Jessop built the 19 hollow masonry 127ft high pillars, each at 53ft wide, with a cast iron trough of 5,25 ft deep and 1007ft long.  But it was the width that had my head spinning, only 11ft wide and only one hand rail, not good for someone like me……. I know I held on to that rail all the way over and I never let go.  I took the photos with my old iPhone, which thankfully I needed only one hand to use.  The view is stunning and I did manage to take some photos of it on this trip, as I regretted that I hadn’t taken any on our visit to Chirk Aqueduct.  If you get the chance to visit, go, but pick a nice sunny windless day 🙂

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The items in the hand, are made up from ones that have been found along the tramway and canal.

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In the distance you can see Chirk Aqueduct, and how small it is compared to Pontcysyllte.

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On Holiday May 2011