Church Buildings

Road Trip Home to the UK, from Interlaken, Switzerland

The last photos of the trip home to the UK, from our holiday in Interlaken, Switzerland, in 2016.  All the photos are taken from the car window, husband driving, not me.  I know its terrible, but I cannot remember any of the place names although there are a few places that I would like to go back and visit.  Although the church on the last photo, will have a post all go its own, after our holiday to Iceland.  So really just a visual road trip home, through Switzerland and France.

St Margaret’s Church, Cley next the Sea, Norfolk

Last weekend we were on the South Coast, blue skies and a little warmth in the air, and then the Beast from the East came, and now Emma from the South.  We have been lucky in the little bit of the Fens we live in, and although it has been below freezing most of the time, only a little snow…..until tonight.  It has come with a vengeance, now I know what the rest of the country has been going through.  We lost our electric at the start of the week when a big power cable came down, so one night powerless and then for three nights we lost the internet……not good, even now it’s very slow. 

Anyway I have found some blue sky, we visited this wonderful church last summer 2017.  I had trouble with my camera, the battery was misbehaving and I only managed a few photos, so a revisit this summer is a must.  St Margaret’s Church at Cley next the Sea, sits above the village green and the church dates to the early 14th century, with the addition of a late 14th century porch.  There was an earlier church on the site, but around 1320 that church was rebuilt.  While the body of the church is intact, the north and south transepts are ruined, and open to the sky.  So really this is just a reminded for me to return and photograph the 24 late Medieval bench ends and more of the wonderful 15th century Perpendicular font.


All Saints Church, Ripley, Nr Harrogate, Yorkshire


Opposite the castle in Ripley, near Harrogate, Yorkshire, stands the parish church of All Saints, which we visited in 2016.  

The church dates from the late fourteenth century and replaced an earlier chapel which had suffered from subsidence, and became known as ‘the Sinking Chapel.’ contains the tombs of several of the Ingilby family, who’s descendants still live in the castle today.  These include the effigy chest tomb of Sir Thomas Ingilby (1290-1369). Their heads rest on a wild boar, in a reference to the incident where Thomas saved the life of Edward III.




St John The Baptist Round Tower Church, Aylmerton, Norfolk – 24

Time for another Round Tower Church, St John The Baptist, Aylmerton in Norfolk.  The church was one of nine that we visited back in January 2017.  We were very lucky, the weather was beautiful and to top it all, every one of the churches were open.  

Nothing remains of the earliest Church, which was Saxon, but the Church appears to have been rebuilt in flint before the end of the Norman period.  To the new nave, in about 1200, the round west tower was added. That it was lower than now is shown by one of its belfry windows, which partly survives below the nave roof.  Reconstruction of the upper part of the tower in 1912 has obliterated all traces of the other windows.  The Church was restored in 1865, and again in 1876, and in 1912 the upper part of the tower was rebuilt to the old design, re- using the old stone and flint.




Isle of Skye, Scotland, Road Trip – Part 2


Oh dear, a little late with this post, only about a year, so not too bad for me.  This is part 2 of our road trip around the Isle of Skye, Scotland in 2017, and finishing on the main land, which we do each year.  As we are going again at the start of May, I thought I had better finish this trip before we embark on the next one.  Each year we find something different and it’s really just a visual trip to enjoy the beautiful Isle of Skye.  

Killerton Chapel, Killerton House, Devon


On a visit to Devon in 2016 we visited Killerton House, and in the grounds we found a Neo-Norman style chapel.  Its quite a large building and just seems to rear up from the ground, I wasn’t too sure what we would find inside, but it turned out to be quite interesting.   I have added some history about the chapel.  


A little history………In 1841, Sir Thomas Dyke Acland commissioned architect C.R.Cockrell to design the chapel you see today, as the chapel used previously at Columb John was inconveniently distant in poor weather.   C.R.Cockrell was renowned for his classical style, but reluctantly agreed to copy the Norman chapel of St Joseph of Arimathea at Glastonbury.  Cockrell and Sir Acland bickered often about the design and the construction.  The interior of the chapel is unusual for an English church, as serried ranks of seating face each other across the aisle rather than facing the altar. The congregation could all see each other; the Aclands, their guests, their senior servants, their lower servants, their estate workers and tenants.




Holy Trinity Church, Marham, Norfolk

Another church that I would like to re-visit is Holy Trinity in Marham, Norfolk.  The door was locked in 2016, there were some phone numbers on the church notice board, but being a Sunday, I was loath to disturb anyone.  I just took a few photos of the exterior and the beautiful display of snowdrops.

Having read about this parish church, which is C12, and late C14, restored 1844, 1867 and 1875 and built of flint with ashlar dressings with slate roofs and the best part…….inside a very interesting memorial.  So another one to go on the list to visit when the weather is more clement.