England

Bluebells, Scotland

Today we visited the City of Birmingham, in the West Midlands,  We had to have some work carried out on the car, and as I have never been to the centre of Birmingham before, I grabbed the chance to knock  the Cathedral off my bucket list.  I must admit I was pleasantly surprised, we went to the Bullring to see St Martin’s Church and also the Famous Rag Market, were I took loads of photos.  We then had lunch, and then went in search of the Cathedral, with it’s wonderful Victorian stained glass windows.  Again I took loads of photos……I will someday get around to posting them, but what really prompted this post, were all the single and little groups of struggling bluebells that I saw.  They were poking out between wire fences, anywhere they could grow and just a glimpse of their blue, reminded me of the beautiful ones in Scotland that we see in May each year on holiday.  So I found some from last year 2016 and I think a little periwinkle, but I could be wrong about that…….

April 2017

Two Tone Spreader

I love taking photos of tractors, and if there are seagulls following the tractors, even better.  This is not a tractor, I think its a spreader.  I really wanted to catch the person driving the machine, for my occupation category, he or she is in there somewhere…..so its going in anyway, as ‘Driver of a Farm Spreader’  Then I couldn’t make up my mind, faded or mono……… 🙂

Somewhere in the Fens – May 2015

Street Photos – Stamford, Lincolnshire

I love visiting Stamford in Lincolnshire, a beautiful little town, lovely small individual shops, plus a great second hand bookshop, nice eateries and the best bit…..five Medieval churches.  I can never pass by St John’s Church with its amazing roof angels, always hoping for the most spectacular angel photo ever 🙂   Stamford has now entered another category that I love to photograph ‘ Black & White Street Photographs’  On our last visit but one, Oct 2017, I thought I would try and get the churches in each view that I took, I got three churches, one brewery and a residential road, not bad.

Hope you all had a lovely Easter Sunday, even if is just a holiday for you…we have had rain, so what’s new 🙂

Denny Abbey, Cambridgeshire, Upper Level

 

This is the last post on this amazing building, Denny Abbey, visited 2016, and its really only, when you climb the stairs that you can really see what is left of the Templar Church.  We can now see the alterations that the Countess of Pembroke made, she was given Denny by King Edward III.  The Countess brought the Poor Clares, Franciscan nuns, here around 1339.  She made the original church into her own apartment, adding a floor, and then built a new church, a refectory (visited in a previous post) in 1330, a dormitory for 40 nuns, cloisters, and other buildings.  The Countess died in 1377 and was buried in the Abbey.  Life continued at the Abbey until the Henry VIII dissolved the monasteries in 1539 and two years later Denny Abbey closed.  The Abbey was sold and became a farm, the building was more like a house, after the alterations, so it was easy to just add an extension, change a few windows and plaster a few walls to hide the old church.  Look and see how small doors were made from large arches, what is left of windows and skeleton of the building….. is the Abbey, hidden for centuries, but still there.

 

A couple of examples of medieval graffiti that I found on the walls.

Exploring Denny Abbey, Cambridgeshire – Ground Floor

Returning to Denny Abbey, visited 2016, this time entering through the old farmhouse front door of the building, into what looks like a building site.  Once you realise what you are looking at, and that for centuries it had been hidden under the guise of being a farmhouse, you start to see the skeleton of the Abbey.  I have added a brief history again, as it has been a week or so since my last post on the Abbey.

A brief history……Having been occupied at various times by three different monastic orders. Founded in 1159 as a Benedictine monastery, in 1170 it was taken over by the Knights Templars and used as a home for aged and infirm members of the order. After the Templars’ suppression for alleged heresy in 1308, it became a convent of Franciscan nuns known as the Poor Clares. Following the dissolution of the nunnery in 1539 by Henry VIII, and was later transformed into a farmhouse.

We have the Countess of Pembroke to thank for what we are about to see, she was given Denny by King Edward III. The Countess brought the Poor Clares, Franciscan nuns, here around 1339. She made the original church into her own apartment, adding a floor, and then built a new church, a refectory (visited in a previous post) in 1330, a dormitory for 40 nuns, cloisters, and other buildings. The Countess died in 1377 and was buried in the Abbey.  Life continued at the Abbey until the Henry VIII dissolved the monasteries in 1539 and two years later Denny Abbey closed.

What we are looking at today is the old Templar Church, that the Countess turned into a house.  It is this latter period that helps give Denny a great deal of its charm. The bones of the monastic building have been exposed by careful restoration work, and visitors can see how the site was transformed from a monastery into a functional farmhouse.  There are some good information boards as you work your way through the building.  I was just totally fascinated by all of it and just so thankful that so much had survived, but I will let the photos do the talking.

 In the last post about the Abbey, we will be climbing some stairs.  


Wolla Bank, Coastal Country Park, Lincolnshire

Last August 2016, we took our four little dogs on holiday to the Lincolnshire Coast and they had such fun.  Empty beaches to run and dig in the sand, bark at the horses…….from a distance of course.  This stretch of coast line is called Wolla Bank, a medieval bank built to keep the water out, so people could farm.  It was a beautiful sunny day, a little windy as you will see from Toffee and Eddies photos….but then, thats quite normal for the coast.  

While we were there I had a go at taking some photos of moving horses, not too bad, but much better when they were just standing around, but it was good practise.  Its not as easy as you think, they can get up to quite a speed on the sand.  

Toffee and Eddie found some friends, but were not brave enough to go in the water.  Nancy and Nipper were off running, but the youngest two, have leads on when around other dogs, otherwise we would never see then again…..well we would, but way off in the distance.