St Margaret’s Church, Cley next the Sea, Norfolk

Last weekend we were on the South Coast, blue skies and a little warmth in the air, and then the Beast from the East came, and now Emma from the South.  We have been lucky in the little bit of the Fens we live in, and although it has been below freezing most of the time, only a little snow…..until tonight.  It has come with a vengeance, now I know what the rest of the country has been going through.  We lost our electric at the start of the week when a big power cable came down, so one night powerless and then for three nights we lost the internet……not good, even now it’s very slow. 

Anyway I have found some blue sky, we visited this wonderful church last summer 2017.  I had trouble with my camera, the battery was misbehaving and I only managed a few photos, so a revisit this summer is a must.  St Margaret’s Church at Cley next the Sea, sits above the village green and the church dates to the early 14th century, with the addition of a late 14th century porch.  There was an earlier church on the site, but around 1320 that church was rebuilt.  While the body of the church is intact, the north and south transepts are ruined, and open to the sky.  So really this is just a reminded for me to return and photograph the 24 late Medieval bench ends and more of the wonderful 15th century Perpendicular font.


All Saints Church, Ripley, Nr Harrogate, Yorkshire


Opposite the castle in Ripley, near Harrogate, Yorkshire, stands the parish church of All Saints, which we visited in 2016.  

The church dates from the late fourteenth century and replaced an earlier chapel which had suffered from subsidence, and became known as ‘the Sinking Chapel.’ contains the tombs of several of the Ingilby family, who’s descendants still live in the castle today.  These include the effigy chest tomb of Sir Thomas Ingilby (1290-1369). Their heads rest on a wild boar, in a reference to the incident where Thomas saved the life of Edward III.





Last year we had to have some trees felled, unfortunately due to age they had became too tall and they had become a little dangerous in high winds.  The above tree had actually been struck by lightening and was dangerous to the other trees surrounding it, but it has and will keep our wood burning stove going for quite a long time.  It was also quite interesting to watch. how they climbed the very tall trees, not something you see everyday. 

I think they are candidates for my ‘Occupation Category’

The Swiss Garden, Shuttleworth, Bedfordshire

In 2017 we visited the Swiss Garden at Shuttleworth Airfield, we had gone to watch an air show of vintage planes, and found a garden to explore while waiting for the show to start.  

The nine acre Swiss Garden at Shuttleworth, was created between 1824 and 1832.  It was the project of a wealthy young gentleman, the 3rd Baron of Old Warden Lord Ongley, whose family had bought the estate in the 1690s.  It was the end of summer when we visited, and the structure of the garden was interesting to see.   It is the only complete late Regency garden laid out in the romantic and Swiss picturesque style. 


The Dogs of Shuttleworth Bedfordshire

Last year 2017, we visited Suttleworth in Bedfordshire to see an air show.  While we were waiting to see the vintage planes, I took photos of the canine visitors.

The Shuttleworth Collection is an aeronautical and automotive museum located at the Old Warden Aerodrome, Old Warden in Bedfordshire, England.  It is one of the most prestigious in the world due to the variety of old and well-preserved aircraft.

Graffiti in Brougham Castle, Cumbria

I have already posted about Brougham Castle in Cumbria, but I forgot to post about some graffiti that I found in the little chapel at the top of the keep.  I love finding old graffiti, maybe it would be better it there were none, but as man has always had the need to make his mark, its interesting to see how he made it down the ages.  The graffiti I came across in the keep it not the oldest I have found, and there might older on site, but I found some dated from the 1800’s……… I must say they were very neat.  

The Chapel of St Mary & MacMillan’s Cross, Kilmory Knap, Loch Sween, Scotland

Kilmore Knap Chapel, St Mary’s on the shore of Loch Sween.  We visited back in 2016 and I did think I had posted about the chapel, but it would seem I did not.  Still, l think this peaceful tranquil place, will not have changed since I took my photos.  Kilmory Knap Chapel was probably built in the early 1200’s and it seems to have remained largely unaltered until it ceased to be used following the Reformation.

Following the Reformation the chapel, by now roofless, found use as a burial enclosure. It was re-roofed in 1934 to provide a shelter for the carved stones found within the chapel and churchyard, and is now in the care of Historic Environment Scotland.

I wasn’t quite expecting the amount of wonderful tomb slabs that I found on entering the chapel, they are amazing well preserved.  

The far end of the chapel is dominated by the beautiful MacMillan’s Cross, carved for Alexander MacMillan, who through marriage became keeper of Castle Sween in the 1450s. The original base of the cross can be seen in the churchyard outside, but given how crisp the carving is, it is difficult to believe it was ever exposed to the elements. It was moved into the chapel in 1981.